Archive for the ‘Tree Care’ Category

Building Climate Change Resilient Parks

Tree Damage at Withrow Park

Withdraw (above) and Dieppe Park both sustained heavy damage to trees during and after the ice storm two years ago.

In the face of rapid, man-made climate change, Toronto’s parks are facing some major challenges.  This is especially true around soil erosion, soil compaction, changing bio-diversity and most importantly, tree canopies.

As many of you know, I’m a student of AGW (Anthropogenic Global Warming) and I’ve just finished a little course sponsored by the World Bank Group.  You might be interested in one of my video artifacts – dealing specifically with Toronto Parks.  It speaks directly to the challenges and ways to overcome those challenges as we drift towards the year 2050.  I hope you’re inspired – at least a little ~ Ed.

A Ryerson Student on Climate Change

Bud burst is dependent on changes in weather

Bud burst is dependent on changes in weather

As some of you know, I’m a student of environmental science with a very special interest in anthropogenic global warming (or AGW)  and how urban parks can be made more resilient in the face of a changing climate.

Last week, as part of an assignment, I interviewed a Ryerson student about climate changes and asked her four questions.  Below are her responses that I thought I’d share with you.  The take-away is that this student sees very few changes in attitudes or behaviors of people or companies as they relates to climate change.  Continue reading

Climate Change and Toronto Trees

Susan Dimitrakopoulos

According to the 2012 city commissioned report on Climate Change by 2050, (Toronto’s Future Weather & Climate Driver Study: Outcomes Report) Toronto is in for, hotter summers, milder winters and more frequent severe weather – in a nutshell.

On the face of it, that doesn’t sound too bad, but it’s going to effect the tree canopy that we’ve all grown to love and cherish.  Climate Change is going to be tough on our trees. Continue reading

Toronto failing to act on alarming climate change predictions

Click to read Environment Canada’s view on climate change

November 11, 2011  – Toronto Star — Tess Kalinowski

The summer of 2012 was a hot one, preceded by a barely-existent winter. But in 30 years, Torontonians will look back on this as a relatively chilly year, compared with the temperatures being forecast in a dire report from the Toronto Environment Office.

The study predicts triple the number of above-30C days from about 22 on average annually to 66. It forecasts five times as many heat waves in the average summer and it warns that the days when the humidex hits 40C or higher will increase from nine a year to 39 on average. Continue reading

Daily Adopt-A-Tree Journal

Adopt-A-Tree Journal

Ed Horner

I’m an early riser and taking 45 minutes a day to look after a couple of newly planted trees in our park, two or three times a week,  is no burden in any way.  Typically I’ll fill my two 5 gallon water jugs, put them in the back of the car, take my Garden Claw and small garden spade, work gloves and a garbage bag and drive around the corner to Dieppe.  I turn the mulch, re-form it back into a donought shape, pull any weeds, and pour in the five gallons of water.  Ten minutes tops.  I then walk around the immediate area and pick up any trash people have left behind and deposit the bag in the litter containers provided by the City.  From leaving the house, filling the water jugs, doing the work and back home for a second coffee, 30 minutes – maybe 45 if I do 3 trees.  Below is a daily journal, updated as often as I think about it.  – Ed Continue reading

Who Are The Friends of Dieppe Park?

Friends of Dieppe Park is a volunteer group that works collaboratively to improve the green space,  climate change resilience, cultural and recreational facilities at Dieppe Park.  We are a recognized vehicle for our community to liase and work with Toronto , Parks, Forestry and Recreation (PFR)  and our local councilor to address issues that affect our park. We are a diverse group who  share new ideas, respect other points of view, and participate in a collaborative process to create a vibrant community park.  We invite you to join Friends of Dieppe Park.  What we do in the park today will have a continuing effect on the park for decades to come! – Ed Horner